"Jordan Jubilee"
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Petra
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A walk around Petra

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A walk around Petra

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     Dana

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Two Bedouin friends and their camels

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PHOTOS OF JORDAN

Jerash

IThese are "thumbnail" pictures. Click on them to open a larger version
There is a map of the archaeological site of Jerash in the "Visiting Jordan" section

A general view of the ruins, with the theatre and the Oval Plaza in the foreground

Twin photos giving a panoramic view of the remarkable Oval Plaza. The temple Zeus on its hill and also the temple of Artemis lower down can also be seen in the distance in the left hand photo

I

Two more views of the Plaza

The theatre where the performances of the Jerash Festival can be seen in the summer

Many of the front seats are still marked and could presumably be reserved for favoured patrons

The main street of "Gerasa" the "Cardo Maximus", running north/south in the centre of the ruins. The lower right hand photo was taken from the "Tetrapylon" or the crossroads in the centre of the town, and you can see the remains of the small shops clustering around it.

Here is the poor relation, the "Decumanus" running east/west. The lower photo t shows the "Tetrapylon" where the two roads crossed in the centre of the town. Originally there were statues on the plinths, and this is where notices of public events were published.

The Temple of Zeus, alone on its hill. This, temple and the temple of Artemis (shown lower down), were the two principal temples in the city. The hill on which the temple of Zeus stands has never been excavated, and it is believed that a majestic staircase lies hidden beneath the rubble left by an earthquake.

The entrance to the temple of Artemis, shown in both directions, and indicating clearly just how close the ruins of Jerash are to the modern town.

The beatiful Corinthian capitals of the temple of Artemis. This temple was designed to be earthquake proof and a guide will urge you to insert your fingers between the sections of the columns to see how they sway in the wind. Indeed, one feels the slight pressure of the column moving. If you decline this experience, he is likely to insert a knife, which you can see moving to the rhythm of the columns. A most impressive demonstration!

Hadrian's Arch, at the entrance to the town, was built to celebrate the arrival of the Emperor in the year 129AD

In nearly all the photos here, one is struck by two things : one, by how much of the original Roman town of Gerasa still lies buried, and two by the proximity of the modern town of Jerash. Indeed, Jerash is virtually split in two by the ruins; in upper photo here you can see "new Jerash" on the hill opposite to the old one.

You can see the remains of columns, still erect, but almost entirely buried. Presumably there is a plaza or other important building beneath the ground here. Efforts are being made to promote further excavations, and to restore what exists. Some of the carvings on the stones are remarkable. Below you can see a stone carver at work on the restoration of a carving, together with a detail of the decoration of the architrave.

Acknowledgements

I should like to thank Todd Bolen of Moshav Yad HaShmonah, D.N. Harei Yehuda, Israel for the use of his beautiful photos of Jerash from www.bibleplaces.com. Many thanks for this, Todd!

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©Ruth Caswell 2002